18 Profoundly Symbolic Bible Stories with Deep Meanings

SharePinEmailThe Bible is full of great stories of the miraculous works of God. Many of the myths that populate the scripture involve God’s work in the redemption of His people. Through God’s miracles, He brings people to salvation. Enduring Meaning of Biblical Myths Many Biblical myths have helped shape civilizations, influencing our understanding and perception…

The Bible is full of great stories of the miraculous works of God. Many of the myths that populate the scripture involve God’s work in the redemption of His people. Through God’s miracles, He brings people to salvation.

Enduring Meaning of Biblical Myths

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Many Biblical myths have helped shape civilizations, influencing our understanding and perception of the world. Here we look at the great myths from the Bible that have acted as metaphors in our interpretation of the world.

Noah’s Ark: We Cannot Go Wrong If We Listen to God

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The story of Noah, the flood, and the Ark is one of judgment and salvation. Amid the wickedness, Noah set himself apart by listening to God and living righteously, and so can others.

Loaves and Fishes: Humbling Beginnings Can Result in Big Achievements

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According to John 6:1-14, Jesus wanted the disciples to feed a large group of people. The disciples said such a task would be impossible. A boy presents five small loaves of bread and two small fish, and Jesus uses them to feed over 5,000 people. The story represents one of hope and how even those with the most humbling of backgrounds and possessions can make great things happen.

Sodom and Gomorrah: Man’s Sin Provokes Anger

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Sodom and Gomorrah were cities that God destroyed due to their wickedness. The story provides parallels with the flood in Noah’s Ark and relates how man’s sin provokes anger in God.

David and Goliath: Strength, Courage and Conviction

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The story of David and Goliath was spoken in 1 Samuel 17. David, armed with just a sling and stones, volunteered to take on the heavily armed giant Goliath. David hit Goliath with a stone and killed him. The moral of the story is how you can develop the strength and courage to defy the odds.

The Forbidden Fruit: Too Much Knowledge Can Come at a Price

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In the Hebrew Bible, the forbidden fruit is described as a peri, so nobody knows what type of fruit was forbidden exactly. Historians have speculated it is likely to have been several different fruits, including mango, pear, grape, and fig. But more important is the underlying message the forbidden fruit in the Garden of Eden brings. Adam and Eve, in disobeying the commands of God, ate the fruit that grew on the tree of knowledge of good and evil, which became the catalyst for the fall of man. The prevailing message of the myth is that too much knowledge can be a bad thing.

Mary Magdalene: How Sinners Can Reform

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Mary Magdalene was a disciple of Jesus, and according to accounts in the Gospel, Jesus cleansed Mary, who had previously sinned, of her demons.

The Prodigal Son: The Value of Forgiveness

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Appearing in Luke 15:11 – 32, the Parable of the Prodigal Son is a story of the parable of Jesus in the Bible. Despite the son wasting his inheritance and hitting rock bottom, his father welcomes him with open arms. The myth speaks volumes about forgiveness and redemption.

Heaven and Hell: Redemption Vs Punishment

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Many Christians believe that when we die, our souls will be judged by God. Those who are deemed to be good and worthy by God will be cast to heaven for eternity, while those who are judged as wicked and full of sin, will go to hell.

Apocalypse: A Combat Between Good and Evil

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The Book of the Apocalypse, also known as the Book of Revelation, is the final book of the New Testament. It tells the story of Christ approaching the Earth when people who led wicked lives would be slain by the brightness of his arrival.

The Tempting Serpent: A Metaphor for Our Evil Inclination

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In the third chapter of Genesis, a serpent tempts a man and woman in the Garden of Eden. One common explanation of the message of the tempting serpent is that it is a metaphor for our evil inclinations. Humans have the freedom to choose what actions we take and often choose to engage in destructive behavior even if we know it is wrong.

The Good Samaritan: Morality

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The story of the Good Samaritan is told by Luke 10:29-37, is the tale of a man who is attacked by robbers who strip and beat him. While a priest and Levite pass by and refuse to help him, a Samaritan intervenes and cares for him. The underlying message of the story is one of morality and caring for others unconditionally.

The Trials of Jobs: The Power of Faith Through Great Adversity  

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Jobs is a righteous, God-fearing man, who, despite losing his property and children and experiencing great agony, never cursed God. His story came to represent the power of faith through great adversity.

Cain and Abel: Rivalry and Sin

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The story of Cain and Abel, the sons of Adam and Eve, bears relevance today in our understanding of relationships and conflict. Cain refuses to understand his brother’s relationship with God and commits murder. The story resonates with a deeper message about family feuding, jealousy, rivalry, violence, tragedy, and feeling overshadowed by the ones we are supposed to love the most.

The Betrayal of Judas: Symbol of Treachery

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Judas’s betrayal led to the arrest of Jesus, his trial, and death by crucifixion. It is the ultimate symbol of treachery, but one theory is that it was part of God’s salvation plan. Without the betrayal, there would have been no Resurrection, which was the founding event of Christianity.

Doubting Thomas: The Pitfalls of the Skeptic

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According to the Gospel of John, Apostle Thomas refused to believe that after Jesus had been resurrected, ten other apostles saw him and his wounds from the crucifixion. The overarching message involves skepticism and the pitfalls of doubting something until you see it with your own eyes.

The Devil: Evil and Temptation

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It is widely believed that the Devil first showed in the Bible in the book of Genesis as the serpent who convinced Adam and Eve to eat the forbidden fruit. For many Christians, the Devil is the epitome of evil, and his story is one of the pitfalls of temptation.

Walking on Water: Keeping Our Faith in Focus

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The story goes that Jesus’s disciples were awoken in the middle of the night to see Jesus walking towards them on the water. Jesus asked Peter to walk out to him, so he disembarked the boat and walked on water too. The message of the story is that we must keep our faith, despite the many challenges and obstacles we face every day.

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