20 Intriguing Facts About the Bible You Didn’t Learn in Sunday School

SharePinEmailThe Bible is a cornerstone of faith and history but it also holds numerous fascinating details that are often overlooked. From unique characters to historical tidbits, here are some lesser-known Bible facts that will pique your interest. The Shortest Verse in the Bible Many know that “Jesus wept” (John 11:35) is the shortest verse in…

The Bible is a cornerstone of faith and history but it also holds numerous fascinating details that are often overlooked. From unique characters to historical tidbits, here are some lesser-known Bible facts that will pique your interest.

The Shortest Verse in the Bible

Editorial credit: Joel Virgo /lightstock.

Many know that “Jesus wept” (John 11:35) is the shortest verse in the Bible, but do you know the context? This verse highlights Jesus’ compassion and humanity when he learned of Lazarus’ death. Lazarus was Jesus’ dear friend and his resurrection is one of Jesus’ greatest miracles. 

Noah’s Ark and Its Massive Size

Editorial credit: KevinCarden /lightstock.

Noah’s Ark was enormous, with dimensions that can rival some modern ships. According to the Bible, it was 300 cubits long, 50 cubits wide, and 30 cubits high. This translates to approximately 450 feet long, 75 feet wide, and 45 feet high, which is about the size of a small cargo ship today.

The Tower of Babel

Editorial credit: PhotoGranary/lightstock

The Tower of Babel story in Genesis 11 explains the origin of different languages. Humanity’s ambition to build a tower that reached heaven led God to confuse their language, causing them to spread across the earth.

Methuselah

Editorial credit: Robert Scarth / Wikimedia Commons /CC BY-SA 2.0

Methuselah, a figure in the Bible, lived for 969 years, making him the oldest person recorded in the Scriptures. His long life is often associated with the antediluvian period, the time before the Flood. Even his name is significant as it means “when he dies, it will be sent.” This is significant as the “it” refers to the flood from the story of Noah’s arc. Methuselah lived until Noah built the arc, but died before the actual flood. 

Unique Animals in the Bible

Editorial credit: Dominikmatus/Wikimedia Commons / Public Domain

The Bible mentions several unique and now-extinct animals, such as the Behemoth and Leviathan. These creatures have sparked debates among scholars regarding their identities and whether they were symbolic or real.

The Bible’s Composition

Editorial credit: Eleni/lightstock

The Bible is a compilation of 66 books written by over 40 different authors across a span of approximately 1,500 years. These authors came from various backgrounds, including kings, fishermen, prophets, and apostles.

The Book of Esther

Editorial credit: Chalermphon/lightstock.

Interestingly, the Book of Esther does not mention God directly. The story of Esther is filled with providence, highlighting God’s unseen hand in the deliverance of the Jewish people. But God is not mentioned by name, making it an interesting section of the Bible. 

The Longest Verse

Editorial credit: BRAIN2HANDS / Shutterstock.

Esther 8:9 is the longest verse in the Bible. It describes the decree issued by King Ahasuerus to protect the Jews, showcasing the detailed and legalistic nature of royal decrees in ancient Persia. It is a long, single-sentence passage with 70 or more words, depending on the Bible edition. 

Jesus’ Profession

Editorial credit: Gino Santa M/ Shutterstock.

Jesus is commonly known as a carpenter, but the original Greek word “tekton” also means builder. This could imply that Jesus was involved in a broader range of construction work, possibly including stone masonry.

The Bible’s Original Languages

Editorial credit: Hebrewish Designs/lightstock.

The Bible was originally written in three languages: Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek. This linguistic diversity reflects the historical and cultural contexts in which the scriptures were composed. Since this time, the Bible has been translated into approximately 730 languages from around the world. 

The Forbidden Fruit

Editorial credit: godongphoto / Shutterstock.

The fruit from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil is often depicted as an apple, but the Bible does not specify its type. This assumption likely originated from Western art and literature.

The Apostle Paul’s Transformation

Editorial credit: Luca Giordano /Wikimedia Commons / Public Domain

Paul, originally named Saul, was a fierce persecutor of Christians before his dramatic conversion on the road to Damascus. His transformation is one of the most significant events in the New Testament.

The Unusual Death of Judas Iscariot

Editorial credit: Rob Birkbeck /lightstock.

Judas Iscariot, known for betraying Jesus, met a grim end. According to Matthew 27:5, he hanged himself, but Acts 1:18 adds that he fell headlong, and his body burst open. Judas’ betrayal impacted all of the disciples, so these differences in the stories of his downfall may be due to different points of view. 

The Bible and Science

Editorial credit: Doidam 10 / Shutterstock.

Several scientific principles are mentioned in the Bible long before they were understood by modern science. For instance, Isaiah 40:22 refers to the “circle of the earth,” hinting at its round shape.

King David’s Harp

Editorial credit: PhotoGranary/lightstock.

King David, known for his musical talent, played a harp to soothe King Saul. The exact type of harp, known as a lyre, was a common instrument in ancient Israel, used in worship and royal courts.

Women in Jesus’ Genealogy

Editorial credit: Sidney de Almeida/ Shutterstock.

The genealogy of Jesus in Matthew includes five women: Tamar, Rahab, Ruth, Bathsheba, and Mary. This inclusion was unusual for genealogies of that time, highlighting the important roles these women played. This also contradicts the assertion that the Bible is misogynistic. 

The Mysterious Melchizedek

Editorial credit: Sky Light Pictures/lightstock.

Melchizedek, a king and priest who blessed Abraham, is a mysterious figure in the Bible. He is mentioned in Genesis, Psalms, and Hebrews, where he is compared to Jesus as an eternal priest.

The Four Horsemen

Editorial credit: Sky Light Pictures/lightstock.

The Book of Revelation describes the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, each representing different aspects of the end times: conquest, war, famine, and death. These vivid symbols have captured imaginations for centuries. They also feature in many movies, television shows, and novels, bringing them into modern culture. 

The Ten Plagues of Egypt

Editorial credit: Ontheroad/lightstock.

The ten plagues that struck Egypt before the Exodus are a series of divine judgments. These included turning the Nile to blood, plagues of frogs, and locusts, and the death of the firstborn, showcasing God’s power and judgment.

The Bible’s Global Influence

Editorial credit: Pearl/lightstock

The Bible is the best-selling book of all time, with an estimated 5 billion copies sold and distributed. It has been translated into hundreds of languages, making it accessible to a vast global audience.

The Bible is not just a religious text; it is a collection of historical, cultural, and literary treasures. Each fact unveils a deeper understanding of its influence and the profound impact it continues to have on millions of lives worldwide. So, while you can appreciate it for the spiritual lessons and Jesus’ teachings, it can also be a fascinating read. 

20 Catholic Beliefs That Aren’t in the Bible

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

20 Catholic Beliefs That Aren’t in the Bible

18 Outdated Church Traditions That Are Driving People Away

Image Credit: Shutterstock.

18 Outdated Church Traditions That Are Driving People Away

25 Quirks of Catholic Culture That People Struggle To Understand

Editorial credit: KieferPix / Shutterstock.

25 Quirks of Catholic Culture That People Struggle To Understand

Leave a Reply