17 Common Practices Among Christians That Aren’t Actually Biblical

SharePinEmailWhile many Christian customs are deeply ingrained in the faith, not all are rooted in scripture. Here, we look at some common Christian practices and beliefs that you won’t actually find anywhere in the Bible. Celebrating Easter with the Easter Bunny and Eggs  Easter is the celebration of Jesus Christ’s resurrection, the single most important…

While many Christian customs are deeply ingrained in the faith, not all are rooted in scripture. Here, we look at some common Christian practices and beliefs that you won’t actually find anywhere in the Bible.

Celebrating Easter with the Easter Bunny and Eggs 

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Easter is the celebration of Jesus Christ’s resurrection, the single most important event in Christianity. And yet, the modern inclusion of the Easter bunny and colored eggs has no biblical basis. These symbols have pagan origins and were later incorporated into the celebration by German immigrants in the United States. The focus of Easter, according to the Bible, should be on the resurrection of Jesus Christ.

Saying the Lord’s Prayer Verbatim 

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The Lord’s Prayer is one of the most memorized passages in the New Testament. But Jesus intended it as a model for prayer rather than a text to be recited verbatim. He valued the importance of personal, heartfelt prayer over repetitive, formulaic recitations. 

Reading Horoscopes to Determine Future Events 

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Astrology and horoscopes are ancient practices that attempt to predict future events based on the positions of stars and planets. Although some people consider the daily horoscopes to be a little bit of fun, the Bible explicitly warns against such practices. Believers are encouraged to seek guidance from God rather than celestial bodies.

Blaming Karma for Life Events 

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Karma is a concept from Hinduism and Buddhism. It posits that one’s actions in past lives affect their current life, and as such, this idea conflicts with Christian teachings and their emphasis on God’s grace and mercy rather than a deterministic cycle of actions and consequences.

Believing in Luck and Superstition 

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Common superstitions, such as knocking on wood or avoiding black cats, have no biblical foundation. Christianity teaches that God is sovereign over all things, and believers are encouraged to place their trust in Him rather than in luck or superstitions. Many of these superstitions have a greater connection with witchcraft, which makes them firmly against Bible teachings. 

“Once Saved, Always Saved” 

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The idea that once someone accepts Christ, their salvation is eternally secure regardless of their actions contradicts numerous scriptural warnings about falling away from the faith. Christians are encouraged to work out their salvation with reverence and humility, maintaining their faith through a lifelong journey. 

Assuming Christians Shouldn’t Struggle with Mental Health 

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There’s a misconception that strong faith eliminates mental health struggles. In fact some people start to distance themselves from their church and Christian community when they begin to have difficulties. But the Bible is filled with figures who experienced emotional turmoil, from Elijah to King David. Mental health issues are complex and affect people regardless of their faith. 

Requiring Women to Always Be Submissive to Men 

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A narrow interpretation of certain biblical verses has convinced some to believe that women must always be submissive to men, and that the Bible is inherently misogynistic. But scripture also highlights strong women in positions of power and promotes mutual submission in marriage, valuing both men and women as image-bearers of God.

Believing God Won’t Give You More Than You Can Handle 

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The phrase “God won’t give you more than you can handle” is commonly used to comfort those facing hardship. But it’s not actually found in the Bible. While the scripture encourages believers to rely on God’s strength, especially during overwhelming times, not every event is the result of divine intervention. 

Having a “Holier Than Thou” Attitude 

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Spiritual pride is cautioned against in the New Testament. Jesus criticized the Pharisees for their self-righteousness. True Christianity is marked by humility and an acknowledgment of one’s own shortcomings, relying on God’s grace.

Avoiding “Worldly” Things 

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Legalistic rules about avoiding secular entertainment are rooted in denominational traditions rather than clear biblical commands. The Bible encourages discernment but doesn’t call for a monastic lifestyle detached from cultural engagement.

Feeling Obligated to Attend Church Every Sunday

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Although regular church attendance is beneficial for spiritual growth and fellowship, the Bible doesn’t set an exact requirement for attendance. Choosing community over location, early Christians met in homes rather than church buildings.

Thinking the Goal of Christianity Is to Get Everyone to Heaven 

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While salvation is a core aspect of Christianity, the Bible presents a broader picture of God’s concern for restoring all creation. Faith should inspire acts of justice, compassion, and care for the physical world, reflecting the fullness of God’s Kingdom.

Relying on Clichés 

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Phrases like “bless your heart” or “I’ll pray for you” can become hollow substitutes for genuine empathy and action. True Christian love compels deeper engagement with those who are hurting, beyond mere words.

Assuming All Suffering Is a Result of Personal 

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When tragedy strikes, it’s tempting to seek a reason, often blaming hidden sin. The story of Job debunks this idea and reveals how suffering can occur without being tied to any personal wrongdoing. Compassion and support are the proper biblical responses.

Tithing as a Legalistic Requirement 

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Giving ten percent of one’s income, known as tithing, is often seen as a biblical mandate. But the New Testament calls for generosity according to one’s ability rather than a fixed percentage, and encourages believers to give freely and cheerfully. For this reason, many denominations don’t have an official tithing requirement for the congregation. 

The Prosperity Gospel 

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The prosperity gospel, which teaches that faithfulness will lead to wealth and health, isn’t founded on any biblical principle. Scripture instead celebrates the struggles and sacrifices of faithful individuals, and focuses on spiritual riches over material wealth.

Understanding these distinctions helps clarify what is truly biblical compared to what has become tradition or cultural practice. Such an awareness can lead to a more authentic and informed faith journey, and could even help you to strengthen your faith and your relationship with God. 

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